Monthly Archives: May 2014

The origins of ubiquitous computing research at PARC in the late 1980s

This is an abridged version of the article. You can find the full version here. Mark Weizer, Xerox Parc Ubiquitous Computing by M. Weiser, R. Gold, J. S. Brown Accepted for publication May 11, 1999. In late 1987, Bob Sprague, Richard Bruce, and other members of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) Electronics and […]

Information that deserves attention, 6

These are the articles and videos from the previous week I found most interesting. The Energy Internet Explained, with Jeremy Rifkin Seeing the past with X-ray vision The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind Echoes from the Big Bang Heisenberg’s Microscope – Sixty Symbols The Energy Internet […]

One day, the internet may be replaced by a "Brain-Net" which transmits emotions, memories, and thoughts. – Michio Kaku

One day, the internet may be replaced by a “Brain-Net” which transmits emotions, memories, and thoughts. –Michio Kaku   Michio Kaku says this brain-to-brain communication would involve not just the exchange of information, but also the transmission of emotions and feelings, “because these are also part of the fabric of our thoughts.” Michio Kaku: There’s […]

Information that deserves attention, 5

These are the articles and videos from the previous week I found most interesting. Runaway Glaciers in West Antarctica What Is Vertigo? Free is a Lie Atomic Legos: Building and Investigating Quantum Materials One Atom at a Time Solve for X – A recap of our 2014 event; Google’s moonshot projects MMS Mission’s Unique Orbit […]

Information that deserves attention, 4

These are the articles and videos from the previous week I found most interesting. Major New Cosmic Simulation: Why it’s Significant Scientists have created an important new simulation of cosmic evolution. It takes place in a virtual cube 350 million light-years squared, and spans a time period from 12 million years after the Big Bang […]

Neuroscience of Learning and Memory

These are 6 lectures by Jeanette Norden about brain architecture, degenerative deceases like dementia, and mechanisms to slow down mental aging. Jeanette is a fantastic speaker and the lectures are easy to understand. Here are some of the notes I took from the lectures. Looking across different groups of animals, the brainstem is remarkably similar […]

Information that deserves attention, 3

These are the articles and videos from the previous week I found most interesting. Michio Kaku on Reading Minds, Recording Dreams, and Brain Imaging Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger? Cryptography Primer ASIMO and Beyond: The history of Honda’s robotics program Get your next eye exam on a smartphone How to create nanowires only […]

Saturation, incubation and illumination

Hermann Helmholtz, a German physicist, was one of the first, in the XIX century, to try to describe the creative process as a succession of steps, which he defined: saturation, incubation and illumination. The French mathematician Jules Henri Poincare, in 1908, added a fourth phase: verification.

The secret of freedom lies in educating people…

The secret of freedom lies in educating people, whereas the secret of tyranny is in keeping them ignorant.Maximilien Robespierre